Etcher – A tool to flash an SD card for the Raspberry Pi

May 12, 2017

We came across a tool called Etcher from Resin.io.  It is a tool meant to flash an image onto an SD card. This is especially useful to quickly setup your new Raspberry Pi. It is a one step process where you can select the image and flash the SD card for your project.

We put together a video that shows how to flash an image for your Raspberry Pi:

 


Raspberry Pi Zero Enclosure – 3D print time lapse!

May 7, 2017

I wanted to document my projects in vivid detail. Recently, I 3D-printed an enclosure for the Raspberry Pi Zero W. I recorded the printing process. The enclosure consists of two halves. The top piece broke while trying to remove it off the bed. In my second attempt, I printed the top piece separately and managed to remove it carefully.

Psst: I am learning to make good videos and I look forward to hearing your feedback


You can now use Google’s AI to add voice commands to your Raspberry Pi – The Verge

May 4, 2017

Google has released hardware that enables to interact with your Raspberry Pi 3 using Google’s Cloud Speech API. Check it out!

Source: You can now use Google’s AI to add voice commands to your Raspberry Pi – The Verge


Webinar on IPv6 over BLE

April 24, 2017

Design News is conducting a webinar on Implementing an IPv6 network using Bluetooth Low Energy devices (BLE) and a Raspberry Pi. The webinar runs for 5 days for 30 minutes. The webinar demonstrates the implementation using a Raspberry Pi 3.

It appears that this following development kit is necessary to follow along with the webinar. I will share my experience after watching all the webinars. The webinars are recorded for posterity.


Raspberry Pi Gets a Wireless Add-On for Mobile IoT Apps

April 21, 2017

Source: Raspberry Pi Gets a Wireless Add-On for Mobile IoT Apps


Jaguarboard – Yet another (not so impressive) SBC

December 29, 2015

I usually back Kickstarter projects(in the DIY electronics domain) that peek my interest. I recently backed the Pine A64, UP and the Latte Panda boards but the Jaguarboard is not one of them.

I usually look for a cool feature that would enable me to build a cool project using the backer reward. For e.g. The Latte Panda comes with onboard Wi-Fi/Bluetooth. It has an ATmega32U4 microcontroller that enables easier interface of sensors.

The Jaguarboard failed to impress me for a couple of reasons:

  1. Lack of sufficient GPIO count – They provide access to only 4 GPIO pins. I usually make use of more than 4 GPIO pins in my projects. However, it does come with an I²C port which could be used to expand the GPIO capabilities.
  2. Incompatible with the Raspberry Pi/Arduino add-on boards – It is not possible to port Raspberry Pi/Arduino projects that makes use of an add-on board to the JaguarBoard platform. It also doesn’t make sense developing expansion modules for the JaguarBoard as the lack of a broad user base is a distinct possibility.
  3. Comparison of specs on the campaign page – The campaign creators have compared the specifications of the board to the Raspberry Pi Model 1 rather than Model 2. The Raspberry Pi Model 2 comes with 1 GB RAM while Model 1 comes with 512 MB RAM. I think that is not a fair comparison.
  4. Unrealistic campaign schedule – In my opinion, the promised delivery date of the board is a tad unrealistic. They promised to deliver the boards by January 2016. The Kickstarter campaign itself ends only on January 22, 2016. As far as I know, Kickstarter takes at least 10 days to transfer the campaign money to your pocket. This puts the campaign roughly in the first week of February. Unless the campaign creators, plan to ship the boards using money out of their pocket, this is not possible.

They also have not released any planned timeline of the project. This is possible only if they already have a stash of boards manufactured, packed and stored in a warehouse.

In summary, I am not impressed by the JaguarBoard Kickstarter campaign.

 


Digikey is selling a red Adafruit Metro!

December 28, 2015

I came across this tweet from DigiKey announcing a red colored Adafruit Metro.

What is the Adafruit Metro?

The Adafruit Metro is a variant of the Arduino Uno. It is enabled by an Atmega328 microcontroller. The main distinction between the Metro and the Uno is the chipset used for the virtual COM port. While the UNO makes use of an Atmega16 family microcontroller for the USB interface, the Metro makes use of the FT231X chipset.

I liked the red color and ordered a unit for myself. The rear side of the PCB contains the Adafruit Metro’s BOM from DigiKey.

At the time of writing this post, the special edition Metro was still in stock @ DigiKey. The packaging gave me the impression that the board could have been possibly manufactured by Adafruit on behalf of DigiKey.